Capstone Baptist looking to ‘do church’ in a healthy, simple way

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Colin McGahey is a bi-vocational pastor for the new Capstone Baptist Church in Liberty Hill. In addition to his Master’s of Divinity degree from Southwestern Theological Seminary, he is degreed in natural resources management and is office director and project manager for the civil engineering firm Poznecki-Camarillo, Inc., in Georgetown. (Courtesy Photo)

Colin McGahey is a bi-vocational pastor for the new Capstone Baptist Church in Liberty Hill. In addition to his Master’s of Divinity degree from Southwestern Theological Seminary, he is degreed in natural resources management and is office director and project manager for the civil engineering firm Poznecki-Camarillo, Inc., in Georgetown. (Courtesy Photo)

By SHELLY WILKISON

Liberty Hill’s new Capstone Baptist Church is working to “do church” in a healthy, simple way.

“We’re seeking balances between a faithful purpose with God and what He wants us to do, and how we can impact the well-being of the community,” said Pastor Colin McGahey.

Capstone Baptist Church, which meets Sundays at Beck Chapels & Events in Liberty Hill, first began meeting in 2014 at Dahlia Cafe as a small bible study group. But in recent weeks, more than 40 parishioners signed a church covenant and attendance is now averaging upwards of 75.

“We’re trying to do church well, in a healthy way,” said McGahey. “And we’re trying to make it meaningful, not just tolerable.”

McGahey, a bi-vocational preacher, was called to pastor the church five weeks ago. He had been preaching Sunday sermons for the group since April 2014.

“They were working through a lot of bad church experiences, and I came from one myself,” he said. “They were trying to heal.”

McGahey said church members avoid talking about the negatives of other churches.

“It isn’t about what happened before, but about what our wants are,” he said. “Not every person is going to fit at every church.”

Capstone created an organizational structure with the covenant as a key component.

“We wanted to build something (covenant) to help each other, to push (encourage) each other,” he said. “We also wanted a safety net, where there is minimal division and back-biting, and send a message that if you want to be devisive, this is not the place for you.”

On the prayer list of the new church are the other churches in the Liberty Hill area, as well as the various organizations. McGahey said regularly, the congregation prays for all of them by name.

He said Capstone Baptist Church considers itself Southern Baptist by verbal agreement. Within a short time, it plans to officially affiliate.

“However, we want those who grew up in other denominations to see the value of what we do,” he said, adding that affiliation is not tantamount to a meaningful church experience.

He said attendees of Capstone range in age from seven to 87, and a full range of bible study classes are held at 9 a.m. prior to the Sunday worship service at 10 a.m. The church meets in the events side of the Beck center at 170 CR 214.

He said the worship service has both traditional and contemporary components, bringing together the old and the new.

When away from the pulpit, McGahey, 39, is office director and project manager for Poznecki-Camarillo, Inc., an engineering firm in Georgetown with its main offices in San Antonio. The company specializes in civil engineering, environmental, survey and land development for public infrastructure projects. McGahey started with the company as an environmental planner in 2011.

He earned a degree from Texas A&M University in Rangeland Ecology and Management and Natural Resources Management and Policy and spent two years managing ranches for an aunt and uncle in southeast Texas.

McGahey’s own walk in the Christian faith began while working for his aunt. As a child, he grew up attending church sporadically in Round Rock, but when he moved to Port Lavaca to manage the farm, it was his aunt’s influence that led him to Christ.

“My aunt was witnessing to me the whole time,” McGahey said. “Then one day I was reading Revelations 4-5 and I heard in my head ‘Jesus is Lord’. I was baptized in my grandmother’s church.”

McGahey said after he married, he began learning more about Jesus and faith, and then felt the call into the ministry.

“I leaned over to my wife in church, told her I was going to walk forward to surrender my life to the ministry, did she want to join me,” he said.

Together, they walked forward and he soon enrolled at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth where he earned a Maser of Divinity in Theology and Biblical Languages in 2012.

He served as senior pastor at Andice Baptist Church from 2007 to 2011, then became kinetic service pastor at First Baptist Church in Georgetown where he served until May 2013.

After a year in the San Antonio office of the Poznecki-Camarillo firm, he returned to Georgetown last year to establish the business in the Austin area.

“I said I didn’t want to be a pastor, but God won’t let me go,” McGahey said of his invitation to pastor in Liberty Hill. “He pushes me into these positions. Where God leads, I’ll go. I have learned the formula. When I pray, ‘God, I will never…’, then He does the opposite.

“Pastoring is a dance where you and your partner (the congregation) figure out how to work together with a common vision and goal,” he said.

McGahey said many have had experiences where pastors or elders did something that caused parishioners to distrust them.

“We can’t legislate sin out of the human heart,” he said. “There will always be conflict, but we can find a way to resolve it in a loving way. We’re supposed to be able to positively disagree but not in a way to hurt one another, like gossip and back biting,” he said.

McGahey said the founders of the Liberty Hill church chose the name Capstone Baptist Church because the corner stone or capstone is Jesus Christ.

“Our corner stone is Jesus,” he said. “We want people to see who we are. We aren’t trying to peel off other churches. We will rejoice when our growth comes from baptisms.”

McGahey said the church wants to stay simple. Instead of loading parishioners with constant activities to fill the week, he said the goal is to equip people with what they need to guide them where they are in their lives.

The church celebrated its official launch on March 8, and McGahey’s sermon topic was about prayer.

“When we approach God, we approach a father who knows what we need before we ask, who desires to bless us more than we want to be blessed, and who can do far more than we can ever ask or imagine,” he said.

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